Garden Photography : Wildlife…

This is a story with a sad ending…

Once up on a time a beautiful python shared the garden with us. He would sinuously slide around.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Occasionally stopping by the fish pond for a drink

snake poised3

We would watch him curled along the branches of the Grevillea tree, waiting…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Next morning a pile of colourful feathers would be left on the ground under the tree and the snake would be gone for a few days.

We delighted in his company, a non-poisonous, harmless type of snake.

Sadly not all people consider it a privilege to have a wild creature share your space and appreciate his beauty.

One morning we found him curled up under his favourite tree, dead, a large gash along his side. Obviously some neighbour thought, as many do, that the only good snake is a dead one. That is so sad as these beautiful creatures will only attack if cornered and will quickly disappear into the undergrowth when they hear you coming.

But to end on a happier note. I suppose the Rainbow Lorikeets and Rosella didn’t mourn him… 

rossella with bouganvillia oct2007

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This month Jude is looking for wildlife in her “Garden Photography” challenge.

“This month I want to see photos and stories about wildlife in the ‘garden’ – insects, spider, birds, rabbits, hedgehog, fox, snake (!) whatever you can find in your garden, public gardens, lakes, parks. But please not the family dog!”

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Categories: Australia, garden photography challenge, photography, Rosella, snakes | Tags: , , , , | 28 Comments

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28 thoughts on “Garden Photography : Wildlife…

  1. Well I clicked on ‘like’ even though I don’t like what happened to the python. I can understand if it was a threat to human life, but why not get it removed rather than kill it. I saw your comment on Meg’s python so was prepared for the tragic ending 😦

    I look forward to your wild life entries, I know you have lots of lovely visitors to your garden.

  2. morselsandscraps

    I love the photo of him in the grevillea. He looks a slightly different colour to the one here, although different cameras might explain it. The rosella is a lovely patch of brightness.

  3. you were right, that was a sad story….I’m not a fan of snakes, but never-the-less, it shares our space on this earth, did he get a decent burial

  4. Such a sad story Pauline 😦 At least he passed away under his favourite tree. I can never understand for the life of me cruelty to animals – even if I thought it was a poisonous snake I can’t imagine doing such a thing.

  5. That IS a sad story. Snakes and spiders have such bad reputations, and so many people (I’m one) can’t tell benign from dangerous that the response does tend to be “kill first, ask questions later”.

    • G’day Karen, unfortunately some snakes are very deadly over here so that is the common response. But in reality you do not see many snakes as they are quite timid creatures and would rather run away than turn on you.

      • “some snakes are very deadly over here” — I know that, I live “over here” too, in Sydney. 🙂 As you rightly point out, I have rarely seen a snake, even while bushwalking.

        • We travelled for a year right round Australia, often camping in the bush and only saw snakes in wildlife sanctuaries. They are greatly exaggerated over seas.

  6. He is (was) a beautiful creature. Ignorance is ignorance, note Donald Trump in the US.

  7. I do like snakes so I find this very sad. If I lived with them I’d be worried about the type of snake they were, do you think people just get rid of any rather than find out what they are? I’m looking forward to the exotic entries this month, its hard to rustle up anything exciting in an English garden!

  8. That’s so sad! He was beautiful.

  9. NN

    Poor old snake. That is a sad story. I’m glad you gave him a nice burial.

  10. I like your garden visitors! What a beautiful bird! 🙂

  11. Oh dear! I’m not a snake lover but why do that? Obviously a parakeet lover 😦

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